My Birthday Gift: The Kindle Fire, and Why It’s The First Credible Android Tablet

Over the past 6 months, I’ve been watching perplexed as vendor after vendor launched Android Tablets into the market with no success. Perplexed for a simple reason – I could not understand how they expected consumers to buy their $559, $499 or even $399 tablets when they could get an iPad 2 for $499 and get the real deal – the TRUE status symbol, the best content & app eco-system. What were Samsung, Motorola, Dell and Asus thinking, I was wondering. Was it a shortage / price of components that pushed them to that price bracket? Was it protecting the brand at all costs, even failure?

A couple months ago, I asked a question on Quora and the results were staggering – over 20:1 for iPad.

So what has changed?  The $199 Kindle Fire. You can get two of those, and still have money for another holiday gift.

Amazon’s Kindle is an ecosystem, not a device. Amazon sees it as a way to make sure you buy all your content – books, music, TV – from Amazon. Just yesterday they announced the streaming deal with FOX TV - more free content for Amazon Prime subscribers. Guess which devices will feature it? Remember Sony’s Howard Stringer’s announcement a few weeks ago – “Apple makes an iPad, but does it make a movie?“. Amazon doesn’t make them, but it sure-as-hell moves them around. In a move right out of Steve Jobs’ books, Amazon is tying it all together – device, app store, content store, streaming rights (with free content for Prime members), e-commerce for physical goods, payment options (from one-click to credit cards), cloud storage, even a loyalty program!

Kindle now touches everything Amazon does, and so many other companies. It threatens Netflix streaming – Amazon is securing more content for Prime members, and has a sound pay-TV model with a complete eco-system around it and it obliterates all other Android tablet manufacturers volume forecasts for the holiday season (a $200 rival with a strong brand behind it).

And it’s a credible contender for Apple’s eco-system. It is as broad, as far reaching, and goes even further with physical e-commerce embedded.

Probably the only risk is execution. If the software / hardware is good enough (defined as – better than most Android implementations), this will make a huge dent in the market. iPad will become the high-end product, but Android, through Kindle, could be the mass-market. Not so different from iPhones and Androids, actually.

My pre-order is in.

How I Got It All Ass-Backwards, or How Android Got Free Again

Free!

Last week I wrote a piece about the huge cultural gap between Google and Motorola, and how Motorola is such an bad fit for the Google organization, and what it will do for it’s relationship with Android licensees. I also stated that if Google acquired Motorola for the patent portfolio alone – that’s not such a big deal in the marketplace.

Well boy was I wrong. A person who’s very close the story saw fit to fill me in.

Google’s acquisition of Motorola was indeed all about the patents. But not necessarily Google’s lack thereof, but really its licensees’. What Google is trying to do to the handset market is what Microsoft did to PCs – give the hardware market to cheap Chinese / Taiwanese / Korean manufacturers, and thereby own the software platform. The catch? The incumbents – Nokia, Apple, Microsoft (and Motorola) own restrictive patents. And they sue / charge these manufacturers to a point where they are agnostic between Google’s “free” OS and Microsoft’s “pricey” one. The only player in the Android camp who was relatively safe was Motorola, who owns a nice portfolio developed over many years.

Solution – Google buys Motorola and promises Android licensees a defensive umbrella – it will fight their patent wars for them with its newly acquired arsenal.

Right there and then, Android is free again.

So what is Google to do with the Motorola organization one might ask?

This is where it gets pretty interesting. You see Motorola is in Illinois. The state a certain president (and his associated mayor) come from. And 2012 is an election year. Who wants to see 10,000 layoffs in Illinois on an election year? Certainly not someone who wants to Do No Evil…
2012 Election

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